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Richmond Office
(804) 262-7153


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Glen Allen Office
(804) 747-3380

Tuesday, 24 May 2022 00:00

Calluses develop as the result of continued pressure on the skin that causes it to harden as a way of protecting itself. Anyone can develop a callus, regardless of their age. While calluses are not particularly dangerous, and not contagious, they can be both unsightly and uncomfortable. In many cases, they do not require medical attention. Some home remedies, such as using a pumice stone to file them down and rubbing in creams that help to soften them, are common. Unlike blisters and corns that form by rubbing against something solid, like a hard shoe, calluses are caused by pressure. If a bone in the foot is out of alignment, such as from a bunion or metatarsal malformation, a callus may form in the area. They also can be caused by poorly fitting shoes, walking, running, and other repetitive exercises. They commonly develop on the feet and heels, usually near a bony prominence. If a callus becomes painful and uncomfortable, it might be wise to see a podiatrist for an evaluation and safe removal procedure. 

Everyday foot care is very important to prevent infection and other foot ailments. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from The Podiatry Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Everyday Foot Care

Often, people take care of their bodies, face and hair more so than they do for their feet. But the feet are a very important aspect of our bodies, and one that we should pay more attention to. Without our feet, we would not be able to perform most daily tasks.

It is best to check your feet regularly to make sure there are no new bruises or cuts that you may not have noticed before. For dry feet, moisturizer can easily be a remedy and can be applied as often as necessary to the affected areas. Wearing shoes that fit well can also help you maintain good foot health, as well as making it easier to walk and do daily activities without the stress or pain of ill-fitting shoes, high heels, or even flip flops. Wearing clean socks with closed shoes is important to ensure that sweat and bacteria do not accumulate within the shoe. Clean socks help to prevent Athlete’s foot, fungi problems, bad odors, and can absorb sweat.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Richmond and Glen Allen, VA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 17 May 2022 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Tuesday, 17 May 2022 00:00

Tinea is the name of the fungus that causes athlete’s foot. It is a condition that affects the feet and is considered to be contagious. The symptoms that accompany athlete’s foot include itchiness, dry skin, and in severe cases, small blisters. This virus lives and thrives in warm and moist environments, including public swimming pools, locker rooms, and shower room floors. It is suggested that appropriate shoes are worn while in these areas, and it is beneficial to refrain from sharing towels. Additionally, washing and drying the feet thoroughly, and wearing clean socks daily, may help to prevent athlete's foot. There are many treatments for athlete’s foot, and it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can determine what the best one is for you.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact one of our podiatrists from The Podiatry Center.  Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Richmond and Glen Allen, VA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 10 May 2022 00:00

The Achilles tendon is located in the back of the calf and connects the heel to the calf muscles. It is responsible for pointing and flexing the foot and is needed while walking or running. Many people can develop an Achilles tendon injury, and it generally causes severe pain and discomfort. It can happen as a result of not training properly or overtraining before a running practice is started. Some patients develop this type of injury if their speed or mileage is increased too quickly, and a small tear in the Achilles tendon may occur. This is a condition that typically takes several weeks to completely heal. Patients may find it helpful to wear a protective boot as the healing process takes place, in addition to limiting walking. Some of the symptoms that are associated with this type of injury include swelling and bruising in the calf area, and it may become difficult to walk. Research has indicated surgery may be necessary in finding permanent relief if not completely healed in six months. If you have injured your Achilles tendon, it is strongly advised that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can effectively treat this condition.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of The Podiatry Center. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Richmond and Glen Allen, VA . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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